432 Park Ave

A welcome site to some. An eyesore for others. Regardless of opinion, 432 Park Avenue has changed New York’s Midtown Manhattan skyline for decades to come and is the first of a number of super tall residential buildings to soar to new heights. The skyscraper rises 1,398 feet to currently make it the 3rd tallest building in New York, following the Empire State Building and One World Trade Center. Not including the antenna on the Empire State, 432 Park Avenue would surpass the building’s 102nd floor.

432 Park Ave
432 Park Ave

432 Park Ave Looking Up
432 Park Ave Looking Up

432 Park Ave 'The Pencil' from a distance
432 Park Ave ‘The Pencil’ from a distance

The apartments are exquisite, with over sized plate glass windows that adore the skyline and with lots of interior space. One would definitely appreciate these living quarters, but they come with a price, which can range from $32,000,000 for a three bedroom to $82,500,000 for a six bedroom and $85,000,000 for the penthouse.

Be that as it may, Ben Landa is adamant about how skyscrapers should look. One might ask – Where are the spires, setbacks, angles, curves, exterior decor or other aesthetic attributes?

Simply put, “Any tall building should have some aesthetic value. Some structures are built straight up like a long box, with no decorations to accentuate its existence. Many architects, such as Gentry, strive to make their buildings aesthetically pleasing to the eye, without compromising function. To have such a tall structure, without making an effort to add real design into it is a discredit the architects who work long and hard to give their buildings an aesthetic component, without compromise on function.”

In addition, Ben states that “Tall buildings should be designed from the beginning to incorporate aesthetic features. Some of the methods could be expressionist design, setbacks, unique, such as those designs by Gentry and Safdie, and / or open areas, such as large atriums. One must scratch their head in awe as to how and why the developers decided to build a building of such height in this manner. 432 Park Avenue looks like a plain stick in the ground surrounded by plants and flowers of different varieties, sizes and designs”, referring to the abundance of tall buildings around it and their differences in sizes and architecture.
With that said, Ben does welcome 432 Park Avenue to join the New York skyline, as it it’s squared facade does have some appeal when seeing it up close; however, from afar, it stands like “a pencil in the wind” and this should have been taken into account.

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